More Knotted Baskets from J. Anthony Stubblefield

My challenge is to maintain a sense of tradition and craftsmanship in my baskets in a world that is fast paced and often disposable. I find beauty in the details; I want edges that are crisp not sharp, materials that are delicate yet strong and lines that are subtle and graceful. I not only teach basketry, but also continue to take classes myself. Both force me to try new ideas and techniques and constantly question my work. Over the years my baskets have become more refined and finished, not so much as my skills have improved, but as my ideas have changed as to what a great basket should be.
- J. Anthony Stubblefield

www.jaskets.com

 

Waxed Linen Knotted Basket     4.5″

 


I completed this basket in the shortest amount of time of all the knotted baskets I have made and yes it is the smallest. Unfortunately in this photo you can’t see the dark green and navy that spiral toward the top of the basket. Like the other knotted baskets I have make I keep it under a glass dome. Dust is the worst enemy to fibers.

 

 

 

 

 

Waxed Linen Basket 15.5”

 

This is the last knotted basket that I have completed and the largest to date. The fringe around the neck of this basket is formed by the unwaxed ends of the lengths of cords. Like a some of my other knotted baskets this one took me a nearly ten years to complete.


The Knotted Baskets of J. Anthony Stubblefield

My challenge is to maintain a sense of tradition and craftsmanship in my baskets in a world that is fast paced and often disposable. I find beauty in the details; I want edges that are crisp not sharp, materials that are delicate yet strong and lines that are subtle and graceful. I not only teach basketry, but also continue to take classes myself. Both force me to try new ideas and techniques and constantly question my work. Over the years my baskets have become more refined and finished, not so much as my skills have improved, but as my ideas have changed as to what a great basket should be.

- J. Anthony Stubblefield

For more go to www.jaskets.com

I will be posting more baskets by tomorrow!

 

 

                       

Waxed Linen Knotted Basket
5.5″

I started this basket one summer to have something to work on while I was working on my tan. I didn’t get very far on either. I estimated that it took me at least an hour to complete one row around the basket. I was very pleased with the way this basket turned out. I have always wanted to title it something like “the birth of fire”.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Waxed Linen Knotted Basket
6″

This is the second knotted basket I made. I started this basket after taking a workshop given by Jane Sauer, a world-renowned fiber artist who specializes in knotted vessels. Jane is from St. Louis, MO and I recently went to a gallery opening of her work. Her pieces go for 10’s of thousand dollars and all but one in this recent collection was already sold. While this basket is only 6 inches tall, including the tassel, it took me a good month to complete and that was working on it almost every day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Waxed Linen Knotted Basket
14.5″

This basket was started in the spring following the start of the second basket featured here. In the photo on the right you can see the basket from the side. I use a styrofoam cone carved into this shape to aid in the “weaving” of the basket. After the I worked up to a certain point on the form I dug out the styrofoam with a spoon. The knots are so tight that the basket is completely rigid. The basket featured was not completed for eight years!

Elquino Arte Travelogue

Nicole Medema has written a fascinating account of her discovery of macrame, love and life in South America.

To read the complete article, go to the page titled: A Macrame Travelogue by Nicole Medema
It is listed under pages in the right hand column of this page.

Discovering Diane Itter


Peruvian Split (9×17, 1983)

Since discovering Diane Itter’s work, I’ve been a bit obsessed. She has inspired me more than any other macrame artist. I think it’s the fact that she limited herself to one material (16/2 linen), and one knot (double half-hitch). Much of her work creates an effect of overlapping planes, floating grids and layers. Most inspirational of all is her control of the color palette. In an article in the American Craft Magazine (Feb/Mar 1980) she said, “I’m not using color for its emotional quality, but I’m aware of the fact that color may affect the viewer in that sense. Color is used purely as an element of design; for contrast in value (light and dark), for visual movement (some advance, some recede) and for the illusion of volume.”


Peruvian Split Detail

On a recent trip to the American Craft Council Library, I was given permission to view and use images of her work that have been given to the Council for stewardship use. While there I spent hours looking through their collection and saw several works by Itter that I haven’t seen before.

I will be posting more work by Itter soon. Meanwhile, I wanted to introduce you to her work and to inspire you with the idea that she starts her work in the center and works outward in all directions. “I’m concerned with construction, with how it’s done, how objects are put together. I’m not interested in making something that will fall apart. There is so much impermanence in the world that I’m interested in making work that will last.” (Diane Itter, American Craft, Feb/March 1980)
Amazing.

Floating Kimono (1983, 9×17)